Resilience Toolbox

Resilience tools can be useful for a wide range of practitioners but it can be hard to find the right tool for the job. The Resilience Shift has assessed a wide range of tools, which are listed below, mapped by the resilience value they add at different stages of the infrastructure lifecycle. More information about the project can be found here.

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8 tools found | Visualise these results in the value chain Show full details for each tool as a list

Diagnose & ConceiveDesign & DeliverOperate & Maintain
DiagnoseOptionsProcureDesign/PlanFinanceImplementOperateMaintainDispose/Reuse
CityStrength Diagnostic
CRAM
CRIDACRIDA
CRPT
ICLEI ACCCRNICLEI ACCCRN
PCVA
UCRAUCRA
WEDGWEDG

CityStrength Diagnostic

CityStrength is a rapid diagnostic that aims to help cities enhance their resilience to a variety of shocks and stresses. A qualitative assessment developed with support from the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR), the diagnostic takes a holistic and integrated approach and encourages collaboration between sectors to more efficiently tackle issues and unlock opportunities within the city. CityStrength is flexible and can adapt to different needs of clients in terms of depth and breadth, and can be implemented in any city or combination of cities within a country regardless of size, institutional capacity, or phase of development.

Content provided by developer.


Who is it for? (NB. Government, civil society, residents, and the private sector)
Phase:
Sector:
Sector specific?No
Type:
Maturity:
Region:
Value Chain Stage: ,
Diagnose & ConceiveDesign & DeliverOperate & Maintain
DiagnoseOptionsProcureDesign/PlanFinanceImplementOperateMaintainDispose/Reuse

CRAM

Community Resilience Assessment Methodology

A concept paper for a community resilience assessment methodology (CRAM). The goal is to assess community resilience by measuring the preparedness of different resource areas and infrastructure systems on which communities depend (e.g. communication and transportation). Built on research and stakeholder dialogues conducted to support the development of a disaster resilience framework, CRAM places a strong emphasis on the interconnection between infrastructure and social systems and complements NIST’s ongoing effort to support community resilience planning.

This is an ongoing development with plans up until FY 2019.

Content provided by developer.


Who is it for? (NB. All key stakeholders within a community)
Phase:,
Sector:
Sector specific?No
Type:
Maturity:
Region:
Value Chain Stage: ,
Diagnose & ConceiveDesign & DeliverOperate & Maintain
DiagnoseOptionsProcureDesign/PlanFinanceImplementOperateMaintainDispose/Reuse

CRIDA

Climate Risk Informed Decision Analysis

CRIDA provides stepwise planning guidance for water resources planners, managers, and engineers to implement robust water management as promoted by the AGWA network — particularly for water managers working in the developing world. CRIDA will initially launch as a publication, and support a community of practice to rapidly scale up implementation.

Content provided by developer.


Who is it for? (NB. Decision makers, planners, engineers)
Phase:,
Sector:
Sector specific?No
Type:
Maturity:
Region:
Value Chain Stage: , ,
Diagnose & ConceiveDesign & DeliverOperate & Maintain
DiagnoseOptionsProcureDesign/PlanFinanceImplementOperateMaintainDispose/Reuse

CRPT

City Resilience Profiling Tool

The City Resilience Profiling Tool (CRPT) is a self-assessment tool primarily addressed to municipal leaders, managers, urban planners, and other personnel with a responsibility for ensuring the safety, maintenance, and security of all aspects and functions of an urban area, including critical infrastructure and services, health facilities, transport and telecommunications networks, sanitation, water, etc.

The City Resilience Profiling Programme (CRPP) designs this tool for generating metrics for urban resilience in order to establish baselines (or ‘profiles’) upon which to integrate resilience based inputs to sustainable urban planning, development, and management processes in cities and other human settlements throughout the world. The main goal of the CRPP is to support local governments and their stakeholders by transforming urban areas into safer and better places to live in, and improve their capacity to absorb and rebound quickly from any and all potential shocks or stresses.

Content provided by developer.


Who is it for? (NB. Local government)
Phase:
Sector:
Sector specific?No
Type:
Maturity:
Region:
Value Chain Stage: , , , , , , , ,
Diagnose & ConceiveDesign & DeliverOperate & Maintain
DiagnoseOptionsProcureDesign/PlanFinanceImplementOperateMaintainDispose/Reuse

ICLEI ACCCRN

ICLEI ACCCRN Process Workbook

The ICLEI ACCCRN Process (IAP) enables local governments to assess their climate risks in the context of urbanisation, poverty and vulnerability and formulate corresponding resilience strategies. The ICLEI ACCCRN Process has been designed in a step-by-step format, divided into 6 phases. Phases 5 and 6 that guide cities in the implementation and monitoring phases will be included in the following edition of the IAP toolkit. The process is also designed to be a continuous cycle of review and refinement, rather than a closed cycle.

The phases are:

  1. Phase 1 of the process will provide all the tools and activities needed to start work with the city. The tools help local governments gain the necessary political and administrative support, establish a climate core team, involve local stakeholders, appropriately share relevant information through a tailored communications plan, and conduct an initial assessment of the city’s progress towards dealing with climate change.
  2. In Phase 2 the main impacts of climate change faced by the city are identified through shared learning dialogues and interactions with the climate core team. The fragile urban systems facing climate threats are also identified and prioritised according to their risk status.
  3. Phase 3 will assist the city government in producing climate vulnerability hotspot maps, in identifying the vulnerable social groups, and in analysing their adaptive capacities as well as those of the impacted urban systems.
  4. In Phase 4, city governments will use the information and analysis from the previous Phases to develop a list of potential resilience building interventions. The tools in this phase help screen and prioritise these interventions, link them to existing city plans, and compile all the information into a City Resilience Strategy.

Content provided by developer.


Who is it for? (NB. Local government)
Phase:
Sector:
Sector specific?No
Type:
Maturity:
Region:
Value Chain Stage: , ,
Diagnose & ConceiveDesign & DeliverOperate & Maintain
DiagnoseOptionsProcureDesign/PlanFinanceImplementOperateMaintainDispose/Reuse

PCVA

Participatory Capacity and Vulnerability Analysis

Oxfam’s participatory capacity and vulnerability analysis (PCVA) tool is a risk analysis process designed to help staff and partner organisations engage with communities in contexts where natural disasters are significant drivers of poverty and suffering. PCVA has its roots in two proven social development methodologies. First, it stems from capacity and vulnerability analysis (CVA) methodology. This has long enabled development and humanitarian aid workers to design programmes based on a community’s capacities as well as its vulnerabilities. It recognises that vulnerable people have capacities to cope with adversity and can take steps to improve their lives, however difficult their situation may be. Second, it is rooted in the belief that enabling communities to genuinely participate in programme design, planning, and management leads to increased ownership, accountability and impact, and is the best way to bring about change. PCVA draws on a wide range of participatory learning and action (PLA) techniques and tools that are designed to channel participants’ ideas and efforts into a structured process of analysis, learning, and action planning, with the overall aim of reducing a community’s disaster risk.

Content provided by developer.


Who is it for? (NB. Project services)
Phase:
Sector:
Sector specific?No
Type:
Maturity:
Region:
Value Chain Stage: , , , , , , , ,
Diagnose & ConceiveDesign & DeliverOperate & Maintain
DiagnoseOptionsProcureDesign/PlanFinanceImplementOperateMaintainDispose/Reuse

UCRA

The Urban Community Resilience Assessment

The Urban Community Resilience Assessment (UCRA) helps cities incorporate individual and community capacities—social cohesion, familiarity with local climate risks, early warning systems and disaster readiness—into broader urban resilience evaluations. By analysing these local capabilities, the UCRA provides a snapshot of preparedness behaviours, risk perception and the strength of neighbourhood relationships. These findings enable individuals to identify context-specific adaptation actions and allow policymakers to engage community members in urban resilience planning.

Content provided by developer.


Who is it for? (NB. Local government)
Phase:
Sector:
Sector specific?No
Type:
Maturity:
Region:
Value Chain Stage: ,
Diagnose & ConceiveDesign & DeliverOperate & Maintain
DiagnoseOptionsProcureDesign/PlanFinanceImplementOperateMaintainDispose/Reuse

WEDG

Waterfront Edge Design Guidelines

WEDG employs an evidence-based approach, focusing on three key pillars of excellent waterfront design:

  1. Resilience: Reduce risks or be adaptable to the effects of sea level rise and increased coastal flooding, through setbacks, structural protection, and other integrative landscaping measures.
  2. Ecology: Protect existing aquatic habitats and use designs, materials, and shoreline configurations to improve the ecological function of the coastal zone, and strive to be consistent with regional ecological goals.
  3. Access: Be equitable and informed by the community, enhancing public access, supporting a diversity of uses, from maritime, recreation, and commerce where appropriate, thereby maximizing the diversity of the harbour and waterfront.

Content provided by developer.


Who is it for? (NB. Infrastructure owners, designers, community groups, environmental organisations, constructors, regulators, policy makers, etc.)
Phase:,
Sector:
Sector specific?No
Type:
Maturity:
Region:
Value Chain Stage: , ,
Diagnose & ConceiveDesign & DeliverOperate & Maintain
DiagnoseOptionsProcureDesign/PlanFinanceImplementOperateMaintainDispose/Reuse

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