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Project 2.2

Policy and Standards

Once we understand how to incentivise critical infrastructure resilience we will need to ‘scale it up’ and make it mainstream.

Aims

Once we understand how to incentivise critical infrastructure resilience we will need to ‘scale it up’ and make it mainstream. This is likely to be a combination of ‘carrots’ such as resilience credits, best practice guidance etc. and ‘sticks’ which may be codes or regulation. We will need to have convincingly demonstrated the value (and to whom) through our activity on Project 2.1: 'Incentivising resilience in practice’ to create the demand for mainstreaming.

Project leaders

Halley McCann

Halley McCann
Project Leader

Halley is a senior consultant in environment and resources, and based in Melbourne, Australia.

 

How are we doing this?

We will award grants, to partners who are actively working in the area of mainstreaming resilience through codes, standards, resilience credits etc., thereby leveraging other financial and intellectual resources.

What are the outputs?

We propose to publish several individual research papers contributing to an event planned for 2019.

Project Resources

The impact of legislation?

Security of Critical Infrastructure Act 2018

Whose responsibility is it to strengthen the resilience of critical infrastructure? The critical infrastructure regulatory environment has recently changed in Australia due to a new piece of federal legislation, the Security of Critical Infrastructure Act (2018) (the Act). Find out more.

 

Learning from the creation of SuRe®

The Resilience Shift interviewed Katharina Schneider-Roos from Global Infrastructure Basel (GIB) on the development and adoption of SuRe® – The Standard for Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure. She explains how it was developed.

Building a community around SuRe®

We interviewed Katharina Schneider-Roos from Global Infrastructure Basel (GIB) on the development and adoption of SuRe® – The Standard for Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure. She explains how they built a community around the new standard.

Collaborators

We have appointed two new grantees to our project on incentivising resilience through policy and regulation. This work aims to understand the impact of policy and regulation on critical infrastructure resilience, and on how it can help to mainstream best practice. Dr Svenja Keele from the University of Melbourne will conduct research into the nomenclature of regulatory and policy instruments. In partnership with the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT), we will undertake a comparative analysis of Federal and State legislation (for both New South Wales and Victoria) to investigate the current legislative landscape for critical resilient infrastructure.

Understanding the landscape

Last year, as part of our work to set up the Resilience Shift, we undertook a series of one-to-one interviews, focus group sessions and a global survey with Arup members. We have brought together the many diverse and informative responses into this report which collates findings from consultations (surveys, interviews and focus groups), reviews and desk studies, in order to define the ‘baseline’ of critical infrastructure resilience in practice.

Read the report: Critical Infrastructure Resilience: Understanding the Landscape.